Cameo103 masth102
February in Indiana History

1 February –

1805 – Vincennes, IN. Indiana’s first House of Representatives gathers. [Kramer, p. 71]

1811 – Franklin County, IN, established. County seat is Brookville. Carved from Clark, Dearborn and Knox counties, it is named in honor of Benjamin Franklin. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1816 – Orange County, IN, established. County seat is Paoli. Carved from Gibson, Knox and Washington counties, it is named after Orange County, SC, where many of the settlers came from. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1819 – Floyd County, IN. County boundaries approved 2 January become effective. [EL, p. 300-303]

1834 – White County, IN, established. County seat is Monticello. Carved from Wabash New Purchase and un-organized land, it is named in honor of Captain Isaac White. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

2 February –

1818 – Daviess County, IN, established. County seat is Washington. Carved from Knox County, it is named in honor of Colonel Joseph H. Daviess. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1832 – Huntington County, IN, established. County seat is Huntington. Carved from Adams New Purchase and un-organized land. It is named in honor of Samuel Huntington, signer of the Declaration of Independence. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1922 – Corydon, IN. Twenty people gather at residence of Aunt Polly Mitchum and gave her a “wood choppin’.” Past 90, Aunt Polly is cutting teeth and is grateful to all who helped her. She is part of the Mitchum community. In 1814, abolitionist Paul Mitchum (also spelt Mitchem), brought 75 enslaved African Americans to Harrison County. He settled them at Mauckport and freed them. Theirs is one of the oldest freedmen communities in Indiana. [Griffin 2, p. 130]

3 February –

1801 – Vincennes, IN. William Henry Harrison creates Clark County from eastern of Knox County. It is Indiana’s second county and the first created under the new territorial government. Clark County covered most of the southeastern fifth of Indiana. It is named in honor of George Rogers Clark. [Kramer, p.38]

1836 – Brown County, IN, established. County seat is Nashville. Carved from Bartholomew, Jackson and Monroe counties, it is named in honor of General Jacob Brown. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

4 February –

1856 – Boone township, Harrison County, IN. Temperature 20 below zero, F. . (See 1 January 1838; 25 January 1887; 10 January 1928; 19 January 1856; 20 January 1856; 1 January 1864; 9 January 1887; 12 January 1918; 13 February 1918; 14 May 1921.) [Griffin 2, p. 157]

5 February –

1826 – New Harmony, IN. Owenites adopt a constitution and a declaration of principles.

1862 – Washington City. Jesse D. Bright, Democrat from Madison, IN, is expelled from the United States Senate, because he wrote a letter recognizing Jefferson Davis as the President of the Confederacy. He flees south and Indiana seizes his farm in Port Fulton, now part of Jeffersonville. Several camps are established on this property, and finally the massive Jefferson Hospital, third largest military hospital in the country during the Civil War. [Funk, p. 121-9]

1959 – Corydon, IN. “Kean’s Kolum” in the Corydon Republican points out that the state of Indiana did not own the land on which the old capitol building sits, until the state purchased the site in 1917, to create the park. All the years preceding, from 1808 until 1917, the ground belonged to Harrison County, even while the courthouse (i.e.: the old capitol) served the state. [Griffin 2; p. 29]

6 February –

1811 – Corydon, IN. George F. Pope resigns as recorder of deeds and clerk of the court of Harrison County. He returns to Kentucky. (17 January 1809; 7 June 1811.) [Griffin 2, p. 84]

1819 – Corydon, IN. William Branham’s widow advertises tavern for sale in the Indiana Gazette. Built by Frenchmen employed by William Henry Harrison, the territorial governor used it when he was in Corydon on business; it is not thought to have been a gubernatorial mansion. Still on Capitol Avenue, it is believed to be the oldest standing structure in Corydon. [Griffin 2, p. 1]

1835 – Indianapolis, IN. The Indiana General Assembly gives Harrison County the authority to vacate the part of the public square west of Market Street. The square has been illegally encroached upon, and it is decided that the county does not require all the land it has for a square. The land is divided and sold. [Griffin 2, p. 56]

1897 – Corydon, IN. Maurice Griffin and Company opens on the square. The Griffin family lives across the square. They make and collect the history of Harrison County through five generations. [Griffin 2, p. 292] 

7 February –

1832 – LaGrange County, IN, established. County seat is LaGrange. Carved from un-organized land, it is named in honor of the estate of the Marquis de la Fayette, outside Paris, France. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – DeKalb County, IN, established. County seat is Auburn. Carved from non-county area, it is named in honor of Johann de Kalb. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Jasper County, IN, established. County seat is Rensselaer. Carved from Wabash New Purchase, it is named in honor of Sergeant William Jasper. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Jay County, IN, established. County seat is Portland. Carved from Adams New Purchase, it is named in honor of John Jay, first Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Kosciusko County, IN, established. County seat is Warsaw. Carved from un-organized land, it is named in honor of Tadeusz Koscuiuszko. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Marshall County, IN, established. County seat is Plymouth. Carved from St. Joseph County, it is named in honor of US Chief Justice John Marshall. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Noble County, IN, established. County seat is Albion. Carved from un-organized land, it is named in honor of brothers James Noble, US Senator, and Noah Noble, Indiana governor. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Porter County, IN, established. County seat is Valpariso. Carver from un-organized land, it is named in honor of Captain David Porter. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Pulaski County, IN, established. County seat is Winamac. Carved from un-organized land, it is named in honor of Kazimierz Pulaski. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Starke County, IN, established. County seat is Knox. Carved from St Joseph county and un-organized land, it is named in honor of General John Stark. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1836 – Adams County, IN, established. County seat is Decatur. It is carved from the Adams New Purchase and named in honor of US President John Quincy Adams. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1836 – Fulton County, IN, established. County seat is Rochester. Carved from non-county area, it is named in honor of Robert Fulton, inventor of the first successful steamboat. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1837 – Steuben County, IN, established. County seat is Angola. Carved from un-organized land, it is named in honor of Baron Frederick von Steuben. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1837 – Wells County, IN, established. County seat is Bluffton. Carved from Adams New Purchase, it is named in honor of Captain William A. Wells. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1835 – Whitley County, IN, established. County seat is Columbia City. Carved from un-organized land, it is named in honor of Colonel William Whitley. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

8 February –

1819 – Floyd County, IN. Board of county commissioners meet; divide county into three townships – New Albany, Greenville and Franklin. [EL, p. 300-303]

1864 – Richmond, VA. Just before daylight, Union officers held in Libby Prison complete a 50-foot escape tunnel. (See 16 May 1863; 21 January 1864; 9 February 1864; 1 March 1864.) [Funk, p. 80-85]

9 February –

1838 – Vincennes, IN. The Western Sun and General Advertiser carries an advertisement from the bank directors for bids to be received by 1 April to supply 200,000 bricks. (See 13 February 1838; 1 April 1838; 1 July 1838; 1 August 1838.) [Funk, p. 60-65]

1864 – Richmond, VA. Starting about 9:00 p.m., Union officers at Libby Prison begin to use the escape tunnel they have dug from an old fireplace in the east end of their dining room to Kerr’s Stable, on the other side of a vacant lot beside the prison. The 70 plus men who had worked on the tunnel had kept their work as secret as possible, but as the night wears on, many of the 1,200 men gather for a chance of freedom. By dawn, 109 have shinnied through the tunnel; 48 will be re-captured, 2 will drown; 59 will succeed in reaching friendly lines and return to active duty. Among the 48 will be Lt. Colonel Ivan Walker, commanding officer of the 73rd Indiana, and a native of Arlington, Rush County, IN. (See 16 May 1863; 21 January 1864; 8 February 1864; 1 March 1864.) [Funk, p. 80-85]

1973 – Charlestown, IN. Charlestown Library building dedicated. Since 1907, the library had been housed in the township trustee’s office. [EL, p. 511-13]

Births –

1773 – Berkley, VA. William Henry Harrison born. [Funk, p. 167]

10 February –

1831 – Grant County, IN, established. County seat is Marion. Carved from Madison County and the Adams New Purchase, and un-organized land, it is named in honor of Captains Samuel and Moses Grant. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1865 – Henry Ware Lawton, recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor and not yet 22 years old, is promoted to lieutenant colonel in the Thirtieth Indiana, which has been so depleted by casualties that the Thirty-sixth has been added to bring the unit up to strength. (See 17 March 1843; 21 August 1861; 17 May 1862; 3 August 1864; 13 March 1865; 4 May 1867; 31 July 1867; 18 February 1889; 18 December 1899; 19 December 1899.) [Funk, p. 136-7]

Births –

1764 – Hartford County, CT. Epaphras Janes born. Revolutionary War veteran who will attempt to found “Providence, IN,” upriver from New Albany. (See 21 July 1818; 14 February 1847.) [EL, p. 453]

11 February –

12 February –

1825 – Corydon, IN. Third governor of Indiana, William Hendricks resigns, in order to take his seat as United States Senator from Indiana. James B. Ray assumes office of governor.

1825 – Clay County, IN, established. County seat is Brazil. Carved from Owen, Putnam Sullivan and Vigo counties, it is named in honor of US Speaker of the House Henry Clay. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1948 – Harrison County, IN. The Louisville Times reports that the Ohio River remains ice-bound. Expected rain did not materialize and the temperature did not warm enough to affect the congealed surface. [Griffin 2, p. 232]

13 February –

1834 – Indianapolis, IN. The General Assembly charters the Second Bank of Indiana. (See 9 February 1838; 13 February 1838; 1 April 1838; 1 July 1838; 1 August 1838.) [Funk, p. 60-65]

1918 – Boone township, Harrison County, IN. Near Laconia, Lafe Crosier notes that the ice on the frozen-over Ohio River at last begins to break up. (See 1 January 1838; 25 January 1887; 10 January 1928; 19 January 1856; 20 January 1856; 4 February 1856; 1 January 1864; 9 January 1887; 12 January 1918; 13 February 1918; 14 May 1921.) [Griffin 2, p. 157]

14 February –

1847 – New Albany, IN. Epaphras Jones dies. He is buried on his own property in the Jones Graveyard, apparently somewhere along East Market Street near Vincennes Street. No trace has survived. Jones was an eccentric who continued to wear 18th century clothing throughout his life. He also believed that the American Indians are the descendents of the Lost Tribes of Israel. He wrote two books exploring this hypothesis. (See 10 February 1764; 21 July 1818.) [EL, p. 453]

1934 - Dale, IN. Florence Henderson is born.

15 February –

1838 – Blackford County, IN, established. County seat is Hartford City. Carved from Jay County, it is named in honor of Judge Isaac Blackford, speaker Indiana house of representatives and chief justice Indiana supreme court. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1857 – Shippingport, KY. Frank McHarry dies. He is buried in a monumental tomb overlooking his beloved Ohio River. Subsequent river travelers will be treated to wild tales of his legendary – legendary – anger and curses. He left an estate of $190,000. His daughters in turn married James Irvin, who operated the ferry after McHarry’s death. In 1905, McHarry’s body joined the rest of the family in the Irwin mausoleum in Cave Hill Cemetery. [EL, p. 600-1]

1864 – Anderson Station, GA. A Confederate prison opens for Union captives. It will be called Andersonville. By 15 May 1864, 15,000 men will be crammed into the facility, planned to hold 10,000. By September, the population is 30,000. (See 15 February 1864; 20 February 1864; 24 March 1864; 7 June 1864; 19 July 1864; 22 July 1864; 10 November 1865.) [Funk, 90-97]

16 February –

1905 – Mauckport, IN. The Ohio River is frozen shore to shore. People walk back and forth on it. The Corydon Republican carries the news that “last Tuesday night” the wharfboat, belonging to George Sherman, and two barges were pulled away from their Mauckport moorings and destroyed by the ice. [Griffin 2, p. 228]

17 February –

18 February –

1840 – Benton County, IN, established; county seat Fowler. It is carved from Jasper County and is named in honor of Thomas H. Benton, US Senator from MO. […Wikipedia.org/ …/List_of_counties_in_In…]

1889 – Veteran of the Civil War and the Indian Wars, now assigned to the Inspector-General’s Department, Henry Ware Lawton is promoted to lieutenant colonel. (See 17 March 1843; 21 August 1861; 17 May 1862; 3 August 1864; 10 February 1865; 13 March 1865; 4 May 1867; 31 July 1867; 18 December 1899; 19 December 1899.) [Funk, p. 136-7]

19 February –

1920 – Corydon, IN. The county commissioners have taken action to purchase Indiana’s last toll road. It is a portion of the Corydon and New Albany Pike, a plank road built by the New Albany, Lanesville & Corydon Plank Road Company, one of the first companies to incorporate in Indiana, and which still owns the length of road in question. When re-built as a US highway, the original planks will be found under sections built up over it. [Griffin 2, p. 158-9]

20 February –

1922 – Corydon, IN. The Corydon National Bank is closed by bank examiners. Its assets are placed in receivership. Businesses and individuals throughout Harrison County are ruined. [Griffin 2, p. 162-5]

1933 – Washington, DC. Amendment 21 to US Constitution proposed. Prohibition will soon end. (See 18 December 1917; 16 January 1919; 5 December 1933.) [Griffin 2, p. 105]

Deaths –

1864 – Andersonville Prison, GA. Pvt. John Melton of Knox County, IN, Co. C, 80th Indiana Regiment, becomes the first Hoosier to die, just five days after the prison opens. (See 15 February 1864; 24 March 1864; 7 June 1864; 19 July 1864; 22 July 1864; 10 November 1865.) [Funk, 90-97]

21 February –

1779 – Vincennes, IN. Many Piankashaw, Wea, Miami, Ottawa, Wyandot, Delaware gather at Fort Sackville to meet newly arrived Henry Hamilton. Yong Tobacco renounces his allegiance to the Americans and pledges it to the British. [Cayton, p. 87]

22 February –

1934 – Corydon, IN. The family of Joseph Pennington, grandson of Dennis and Elizabeth Pennington, donate a bookcase belonging to Dennis Pennington to the Old Capitol. It is placed in the building which its owner built and where he spent so much time as a legislator. [Griffin 2, p. 42]

23 February –

1779 – Vincennes, IN. George Rogers Clark, with fewer than 200 men, arrives to re-capture Fort Sackville. [Cayton, p. 70]

24 February –

1779 – Vincennes, IN. Henry Hamilton surrenders Fort Sackville to George Rogers Clark. [Cayton, p. 74]

1862 – Jeffersonville, IN. In the wake of General U.S. Grant’s capture of Fort Donelson, General Simon Bolivar Buckner, plus 135 other men, arrive in Jeffersonville, en route to Camp Morton, Indianapolis, IN. [Kramer, p. 168]

1926 – Corydon, IN. The old “white caps” of the 19th century are to be revived by the Indiana Bankers Association in a state-wide plan to stop bank robberies. Vigilantes are to be armed in each county, provided with an automobile, and sworn in as special deputies, to pursue bank robbers. An alarm system has been worked out with the telephone and telegraph, but additionally, bombs are also distributed throughout the county. These are electrically detonated from a central headquarters and can be set off to alert anyone in the area – an 8-mile area – that bank robbers are about. The bankers of Harrison County are offering a reward of $2,500 for the boy of dead “bandits” and $1,000 for a live one. [Griffin 2, p. 163]

25 February –

1779 – Vincennes, IN. Henry Hamilton surrenders Fort Sackville and his garrison to George Rogers Clark. [Funk, p. 178]

1928 – Corydon, IN. Officers of the Indiana Grand Lodge of Masons participate in the ceremonial laying of the cornerstone of the new Harrison County courthouse. The existing Harrison County courthouse is the one which served as the first state capitol building. [Griffin 1, p. 71]

26 February –

27 February –

1991 – Corydon, IN. Indiana has a record deer harvest for 1990, around 88,000 animals. This is the ninth straight year of record deer hunts. Population increase is a lesser cause. The main reason for record kills is relaxation of restrictions; more animals in more locations are “fair game.” [Griffin 2, p. 90]

28 February –

29 February –


 

[Home] [Characters] [Storytelling] [Ghost Stories] [Contact Information] [On this day] [Kentucky History] [Indiana History] [Clark Family History] [Falls of the Ohio History] [Pennington Chapel] [Corydon] [Speaking Dates]

© 2008-2013, MANDY THE STORYTELLER   ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
Website Designed and Maintained by
Graphic Enterprises

GELOGOsm02