Cameo103 masth102
May in Kentucky History

1 May –

1769 – Yadkin Valley, NC. A party of six men, including Daniel Boone, John Stuart and John Finley, set out for Kentucky, traveling through the Cumberland Gap. [KE, p. 96]

1778 – Louisville, KY, founded on land owned by John Connolly, British loyalist and traitor. Virginia House of Burgesses confiscates his land, confirms settlers titles, and establishes a town government for Louisville. [EL, p. 186-9]

1780 – Virginia General Assembly grants town charter for Louisville [later in Kentucky!].

1821 – KY/TN border. William Steele, Kentucky surveyor, and Absalom Looney, Tennessee surveyor, begin a line on Cumberland Mountain. They are proceeding to the Cumberland River. (See also 2 July 1821 entry.) [KE, p. 103]

1860 – Kentucky. Metcalf County formed from Barren County, with bits from Hart, Green, Adair, Cumberland and Monroe counties, as well. It is named in honor of 10thgovernor, Thomas Metcalfe (1828-32). [KE, p. 630-31]

1873 – LaGrange, KY. The Masonic University, founded as Funk Seminary in 1841, is forced to revert to a high school. (See 24 September 1911.) [KE, p. 615]

1884 – Louisville, KY. Moses Fleetwood “Fleet” Walker, catcher for the (integrated) Toledo Blue Stockings baseball team, becomes the first African American to play major-league baseball, when he takes the field in the season opener in Louisville. In August, 1881, when he had attempted to play for the White Sewing Machine Company team, of Cleveland, some of the Louisville Eclipse Club players walked off the field, and Walker was not permitted to play. Understandably, he was “off his game” in the Louisville match. [EL, p. 9-10]

1905 – Louisville, KY. Louisville and Interurban Railroad Company establishes service to Okolona, KY. [EL, p. 418-20]

1905 – Louisville, KY. The Seelbach Hotel at 4thand Walnut opens. [Potter]

1974 – Louisville, KY. John Wayne is grand marshal of the Pegasus Parade preceding the 100thKentucky Derby. (See 4 May 1974.) [EL, p. 467-70]

1999 – Louisville, KY. Churchill Downs packs 151,051 people into 48,447 seats, the infield, and the backside. The poetically named Charismatic wins the 125thKentucky Derby. [EL, p. 467-70]

Births –

1867 – Owingsville, KY. May Stone born. She will be a co-founder of Hindman Settlement School. (See 29 January 1946.) [KE, p. 857]

1939 – Dallas, TX. Professional golfer Frank Beard born – he will be raised in Louisville, KY. [KE, p. 61]

1940 – Mayfield, KY. Bobbie Ann Mason born. She will become a well-known author. [KE; p. 614]

Deaths –

1928 – Louisville, KY. Henry Bain dies. In a 40 year career at Louisville’s Pendennis Club, this African American created a delectable sauce for beef which is used today by Louisville’s best, and no-so-best, cooks. [EL, p. 381]

2 May –

1786 – Virginia. Alexander Scott Bullitt, twenty-four years old, is appointed a trustee of the city of Louisville, by the Virginia legislature. [KE, p. 139]

1797 – Louisville, KY. John and Susannah Rudy Herr formalize purchase of Richard Taylor’s house and 117 acres. [Renau, p. 91]

1825 – Ohio River, Kentucky. Marquis de La Fayette and party transfer to steamboat Mechanicand enter Cumberland River. (See 15 August 1824; 18 April 1825; 30 April 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1860 – United States Treasury Department issues order banning trade with Confederacy; surveyor of customs at Louisville, Walter Haldeman, fails to enforce the order. (EncLou, p. xix)

1903 – Jeffersontown, KY. The Beargrass Railway interurban establishes service to Louisville. [EL, p. 441-2]

1904 – Louisville, KY. Louisville and Interurban Railroad Company establishes service to Jeffersontown, KY. [EL, p. 418-20]

1970 – Louisville, KY. The Kentucky Derby has its first woman jockey. Diane Crump, aboard Fathom, finishes 15th. Winner is Dust Commander. [EL, p. 467-70]

Births –

1886 – Louisville, KY. Edgar Boyd Martin born. In 1909 he will write the first review of a motion picture, Thomas Edison’s The Great Train Robbery. He didn’t like it. He will also found three local theatre companies. (See 15 April 1963.) [EL, p. 591]

Deaths –

1898 – Louisville, KY. David Wendel Yandell dies. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See 4 September 1826.) [KE, p. 971]

3 May –

1775 – near Boonesborough, KY. Richard Henderson describes John Floyd in his journal as a man “with a great show of Modesty and open honest countenance and no small share of good sense.” [KE, p. 330]

1797 – Louisville, KY. Jefferson County Court approves Abraham Bruner’s petition to establish a town on his land. Called Brunerstown, Jeffersontown has begun. [EL, p. 441-2]

1797 – Prestonsburg, KY. Town founded, after six years of settlement. (See 2 January 1818.) [KE, p. 739]

1825 – Lyon, Livingston, Trigg counties, KY. The Marquis de La Fayette passes through. (See 15 August 1824; 18 April 1825; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1886 – Kentucky. Carlisle County created from Ballard County. The area was originally part of Hickman County. [KE, p. 164]

1890 – Hardinsburg, KY. The town, lots laid out in 1780, is incorporated. [KE, p. 405]

1940 – Louisville, KY. On Derby Eve, at the Jefferson County Armory (now The Gardens of Louisville), Louisvillian Sammy Angott boxes Davey Day, from Chicago. Referee and ex-champ Jack Dempsey gives Angott a 2-point decision. Louisville has its first champion since Marvin Hart, many years before. [EL, p. 109]

1943 – Louisville, KY. First completed aircraft leaves the runway at Curtiss-Wright Aircraft Factory. It will crash seven days later, claiming the lives of the three crewmen. [EL, p. 235-6]

1956 – Louisville, KY. The first Pegasus Parade heads down Broadway. The Kentucky Derby Festival has begun. [EL, p. 470-1]

1974 – Louisville, KY. Quaze Quilt wins the 100thKentucky Oaks. [EL, p. 476-7]

1991 – Louisville, KY. Lite Light becomes the first Kentucky Oaks winner to wear the Lilies for the Fillies, a garland of 188 white star gazer lilies edged with oak ivy leaves. [EL, p. 476-7]

Births –

1922 – Letcher County, KY. Harry Monroe Caudill born. His 1963 book Night Comes to the Cumberlandswill change the history of eastern Kentucky. [KE, p. 172-3]

4 May –

1825 – Nashville, TN. Marquis de La Fayette arrives. (See 15 August 1824; 18 April 1825; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1962 – Louisville, KY. The last of the Derby Eve boxing matches Jimmy Ellis vs. Holly Mims in the main event. [EL, p. 110]

1968 – Louisville, KY. Dancer’s Image wins the Kentucky Derby, but is later disqualified when phenylbutazone, an aspirin-like anit-inflamatory painkiller, is found is his urine. Allowed at most tracks, it was then banned at Churchill Downs. It is now allowed at the Downs. It is several years before courts decide that for pari-mutual wagering, Dancer’s Image is the winner, but for the record books, Forward Pass, of Calumet Farms, is the Derby winner. This Derby and this decision remain controversial 40 years later. [EL, p. 467-70; ]

1969 – Louisville, KY. Fontaine Ferry Park vandalized during racial unrest. [KE, p. 338]

1974 – Louisville, KY. Cannonade wins the 100thKentucky Derby. (See 1 May 1974.) [EL, p. 467-70]

1987 – around Middlesborough, KY. Several counties of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia, proclaim themselves the State of Cumberland. Instead of kicking off another War Between the States, the flourish of publicity promotes tourism in the area. [KE, p. 245]

Births –

1812 – Richmond, VA. John White Stevenson born. As Kentucky governor 1867-71, he will use the militia to safeguard the new rights of African Americans and will advocate speedy restoration of rights to ex-Confederates. (See 10 August 1886.) [KE, p. 854-5]

Deaths –

1866 – Louisville, KY. Captain Thomas Joyes dies, becoming one of the first white males born in the city to die in the city. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See 8 January 1799; 31 May 1877; 9 December 1787.) [EL, p. 454]

1873 – Charlottesville, VA. William Holmes McGuffey dies. (See 23 September 1800.) [KE, p. 597-8]

5 May –

1782 – Virginia. Lexington (KY) created. [KE, p. 310-1]

1789 – Louisville, KY. Isaac Shelby’s sale of his Jefferson County land to speculator Joseph Brooks recorded at Jefferson County Courthouse. The sale was in 1787.

1908 – Louisville, KY. Stone St. receives a blanket of roses across his withers after winning the Kentucky Derby. This will now be standard for the winner. Matt Winn also reintroduces pari-mutuel wagering at Churchill Downs. [EL, p. 467-70]

1931 – Evarts, KY. The Battle of Evarts: Ten deputies in three cars pass through town escorting a nonunion miner to the Black Mountain coal mine. Two hundred yards outside the town, about three hundred miners ambushed the caravan. (See 1 March 1931 and 7 May 1931 entries.) [KE, p. 301]

1931 – Louisville, KY. The Louisville and Interurban Railroad Company abandons the line to Okolona, KY. [EL, p. 418-20]

1951 – Louisville, KY. The Duke and Duchess of Windsor attend the Kentucky Derby. [Potter]

1973 – Louisville, KY. Secretariat wins the Kentucky Derby in one minute, 59 and 2/5 seconds. This is still the record. [EL, p. 467-70]

1989 – Louisville, KY. For the first time, the infield is opened for Kentucky Oaks fans. Open Mind is the winner. [EL, p. 476-7]

Deaths –

1883 – Dresden, Ontario, Canada. Josiah Henson dies. (See 15 June 1789.) [KE, p. 426]

1918 – Sarasota, FL Bertha Matilde Honore Palmer dies. She is buried in Graceland Cemetery, Chicago, in a mausoleum with her husband. (See 22 May 1849.) [EL, p. 687-8]

5-6 May –

1825 – Cumberland River. The Marquis de La Fayette steams back toward the Ohio River. (See 15 August 1824; 18 April 1825; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

6 May –

1899 – Louisville, KY. The North Kentucky Conference, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, organized. [EL, p. 184]

1906 – Louisville, KY. Cornerstone laid for St. Paul’s Evangelical Church, 219 East Broadway. The congregation came together in 1836, meeting in members homes. All services were conducted in German until 1897. [Potter] The building is presently leased out as medical offices, but is somewhat endangered. 

Deaths –

1849 – Louisville, KY. James Douglas Breckinridge dies. Born at Woodville, Jefferson County, KY, he was an influential attorney and politician, elected to both state and federal office. His daughter, Mary Eliza, married William Shakespeare Caldwell, who named Sts. Mary and Elizabeth Hospital in her honor. His second wife was Lucy Fry Speed, daughter of Farmington’s owner, John Speed. [EL, p. 115]

1859 – Louisville, KY. Joseph Brown Smith dies. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. His entire career as a musician and teacher was in Louisville. (See 14 May 1823.) [EL, p. 828]

7 May –

1784 – Louisville, KY. George Pomeroy brought before a magistrate on a charge of spreading false rumors. He has come from Pennsylvania to promulgate the thesis in Thomas Paine’s Public Good. This treatise used much the same persuasion found in Common Senseto argue that Virginia had no control over Kentucky, therefore could not apportion land there, and that the Federal government should establish a state “in back of Virginia.” Mr. Pomeroy had settled on land already “owned” contending that only the Continental Congress could grant title to western lands. He is fined 2,000 pounds of tobacco, and must give security of 3,000 pounds to assure his future good behavior. A man named Galloway precipitated the same scene in Lexington, but agreed to leave the state. [KE, p. 707-8]

1825 – Ohio River, Kentucky. Marquis de La Fayette steams upriver toward Louisville. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1893 – Louisville, KY. Highland Baptist Church holds its first service. [EL, p. 383-4]

1931 – Evarts, KY. Governor Flem D Sampson’s 370 National Guardsmen arrive to halt picketing, break up rallies and charge miners for the murders committed on 5 May Battle of Evarts. The strike at first spreads throughout Harlan County and into Bell County, but collapses by mid-June. [KE, p. 301]

1931 – Louisville, KY. Mutual Standard Bank closes and is subsequently liquidated by the Kentucky Banking Commission. It will be more than forty years before Louisville will have another African American bank. (See 17 January 1921; 5 February 1921; 17 November 1930.) [EL, p. 291-2]

1949 – Louisville, KY. WAVE-TV broadcasts the Kentucky Derby for the first time. This Diamond Jubilee race is won by Ponder. [EL, p. 467-70]

Births –

1742 – Botetourt County, VA. Joseph Crockett born. He will be a Revolutionary War soldier, serving with George Rogers Clark, and a leader in early Kentucky. [KE, p. 242]

1907 – Carlisle, PA. Gloucester Caliman Coxe born. He will be the first African American to receive an Allen R. Hite Art Scholarship and the University of Louisville’s first African American fine arts graduate. (See 24 July 1999 entry.) [EL, p. 228-9]

1933 – Pittsburg, PA. John Constantine Unitas born. The University of Louisville will offer him a football scholarship. [KE, p. 908]

8 May –

1775 – Boonesborough, KY. The colony of Transylvania is formally named, as is its capitol, Boonesborough. [KE, p. 100]

1825 – Ohio River, Kentucky. Steamboat Mechanichits something and sinks in the evening. The Marquis de La Fayette and his party spend the night on shore. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1826 – Frankfort, KY. Jereboam O Beauchamp is tried for the murder of Solomon Sharp. During the 1824 election campaign for attorney general, John V. Waring had smeared Sharp with accusations that, in 1820, Sharp had seduced Ann Cook, of Bowling Green, and had fathered a child with her. Only recently, Cook had married Beauchamp, insisting that he avenge her honor. Beauchamp obliged by stabbing to death Sharp. He was found guilty and sentenced to hang. (See also 5 November 1825; 7 November 1825; 5 July 1826; and 7 July 1826 entries.) [KE, p. 63-4]

1915 – Louisville, KY. Regret becomes the first filly to win the Kentucky Derby. [EL, p. 467-470]

Deaths –

1902 – Cynthiana KY. Joseph Desha dies. He is buried in Cynthiana Cemetery. (See 26 March 1866 and 22 August 1921 entries.) [KE, p. 265]

9 May –

1808 – Lexington, KY. First mention in Kentucky of Asa Blanchard, master silversmith, clock- and watchmaker, is a contract binding to him apprentice William Grant. [KE, p. 86]

1825 – Ohio River, Kentucky. Steamboat Paragonpicks up the Marquis de La Fayette and his party in the morning. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1895 – Louisville, KY. Fulton Gordon acquitted of murder in deaths of his wife and Arch Brown. (See also 30 May 1895 and 1 July 1895.) [EL, p. 136]

1961 – Campbell County, KY. George W. Ratterman, candidate for county sheriff, goes to a purported meeting with a crime syndicate boss. He is drugged and wakes up in a hotel bedroom with a nightclub dancer. He is promptly arrested by local police for prostitution and disturbing the peace. At the subsequent trial in Newport police court, it becomes clear that the crime syndicate is well entrenched with local officials. A photographer testifies that he has been contacted weeks previously about photographing a compromising situation. The charges are dismissed, the reform movement roars to the forefront, Ratterman is elected sheriff and the gamblers leave town. [KE, p. 755-8]

Deaths –

1844 – Louisville, KY William A. Cole, former mayor, dies. He was also Louisville’s first marshal for the Chancery Court, elected in 1828, along with first mayor, John C. Bucklin. (See 21 March 1836 and 15 March 1837 entries.) [El, p. 209]

1936 – Williamsburg, KY. Julia Ann Marcum dies. She is a retired schoolteacher and the only woman combatant in the Civil War recognized by the United States government with a military pension in her own right. (See 7 November 1844.) [KE, p. 608]

1940 – Louisville, KY. Former Jefferson County judge James Parker Gregory dies. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See 12 December 1862.) [EL, p. 359]

10 May –

1791 – Louisville, KY. Joseph and Anne Brooks sell remainder of Isaac Shelby land (now Windy Hills), 175 acres, to William Sullivan. [Renau, p. 49]

1844 – Louisville, KY. David L. Beatty’s term as mayor finishes. His election had been contested, but in a second ballot, he won handily. He will live another 40 years, and be buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See also 17 May 1841 entry.) [EL, p. 79]

1846 – Louisville, KY. The Second African Church, later Green Street Baptist Church, votes to discipline members who violate any of a specific and strict code of conduct ranging from wife beating and fighting to malicious gossip to attending a carnival or circus. Later, the church will require members to obtain a marriage license from the commonwealth within 90 days of marriage, ending the slavery times custom of simply jumping the broomstick. (See 29 September 1844; 3 August 1967.) [EL, p. 358]

1883 – Louisville, KY. City’s first business use of incandescent light bulbs, a woolen mill in Butchertown. [EL, p. 513-6]

1892 – Louisville, KY. The first five graduates of Central Law School hold commencement exercises at the Masonic Temple Theatre. Central Law is the only black-supported law school in the country. [EL, p, 539]

1902 – Louisville, KY. Walter Newman Haldeman, newspaper tycoon, is struck by a streetcar while on his way to work on Saturday morning. He is 81 years old. He will die three days later and be buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See 27 April 1821.) [KE, p. 398]

1929 – Kentucky. Fourteen-thousand acres of Bullitt County “knoblands” transferred from ownership of Isaac Wolfe Bernheim to the newly created Isaac W. Bernheim Foundation. Bernheim Forest has begun. [EL, p. 86]

1947 – Louisville, KY. William Rannell Vance becomes mayor. He will serve through 13 May 1850. (See 1 June 1848.) [EL, p. 909]

1969 – Shephersville, KY. A tornado touches down creating half a million dollars in damage, but no deaths. [EL, p. 889]

Births –

1720 – Germantown, PA. Abraham Hite born. He will be an important settler in what is now Louisville, KY. [EL, p. 392]

Deaths –

1876 – Louisville, KY. Ellen (Mrs. Antoine Bidermann) Du Pont dies, giving birth to the couple’s eighth child, who also dies. [KE, p. 275]

1966 – Cynthiana, KY. Mary Peterson “Cissy” Gregg dies. She is buried in the Battle Grove Cemetery. (See also 26 April 1903.) [KE, p. 392]

11 May –

1825 – Portland, KY. The Marquis de La Fayette arrives. A crowd of 10,000 greet his arrival in Louisville. This evening, a Mason, he will meet with Masons of Louisville’s two lodges, Clark Lodge and Abraham Lodge, at the Clark Lodge. Later still, there is a grand ball. [EL, p. 496-7] (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1914 – Louisville, KY. Mayor John Henry Buschemeyer signs the ordinance prohibiting sales of property to persons of a different race from the current owners. [EL, p. 147-8]

Births –

1888 – Natlee, Owen County, KY. Willis Augustus Lee Jr. born. He will be a naval officer in World War II. (See 14 November 1942; 25 August 1945.) KE, p. 540-1]

1912 – Louisville, KY. Foster Brooks born. He will earn a place in history, broadcasting for WHAS radio while clinging to a telegraph/telephone pole during the 1937 flood. He will win national fame as the “Lovable Lush” character on television and in Las Vegas, NV. [EL, p. 131]

1936 – New York, NY. George Harvey Ingalls Sloane born. He will be mayor of Louisville 1 December 1973 – 1 December 1977; Jefferson County judge/executive 4 January 1986 – 1 January 1990. He championed liberal causes and help for indigents. [EL, p. 827]

12 May –

1797 – Louisville, KY. John Herr, 27-years-old, buys Taylor house and 117 acres from his Rudy in-laws. [Renau, p. 99]

1825 – Louisville, KY. General Lafayette and his party cross the Ohio River on the General Piketo Jeffersonville, IN, guests of the Indiana governor. [EL, p. 496-7]

1890 – Bowling Green, KY. Potter College, a private, nondenominational women’s college, incorporated by General Assembly. It will close in 1909. (See 9 September 1889.) [KE, p. 731]

13 May –

1825 – Louisville, KY. The Marquis de La Fayette and party leave, embarking on a tour of central Kentucky. They journey down the Old State Pike to Shelbyville for the night. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1846 – Washington City. United States declares war on Mexico. [KE, p. 633-4]

Births –

1744 – Berks County, PA. Abraham Lincoln born. In May 1786 he will be killed by Indians on a branch of Floyd’s Fork called Long Run, Jefferson County, KY. Almost 30 years later, his grandson will be named after him. [EL, p. 516-7]

14 May –

1825 – Frankfort, KY. Marquis de La Fayette attends dinner and a ball. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1853 – New Orleans, LA. Steamboat Eclipsedeparts. This begins the race between Eclipseand the A.L. Shotwell. Both were New Albany boats of the latest design and technology. The Eclipsewould eclipse all competition, but the Shotwellwas touted as her equal, if not superior. Only a race would settle the matter – maybe. The Eclipse Louisville in record time: four days, nine hours, thirty minutes. (See also 17 May 1853; 6 June 1853.) [EL, p. 262]

1945 – Okinawa, Japan. The forces of Lt. Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner Jr. break through the main Shuri Japanese line. [KE, p. 137]

Births –

1772 – Caswell County, NC. Charles Caldwell born. He will become a respected physician and educator. In 1821, he takes ten thousand dollars from the Kentucky General Assembly and some other grants, goes to France and purchases a remarkable assortment of scientific books, many of which are still housed at Transylvania College, Lexington, KY. (See also 9 July 1853 entry.) [EL, p. 154-5]

1823 – Dover, NH. Joseph Brown Smith born. He will be the first totally blind person to graduate from a university (Harvard) in the United States. (See 6 May 1859.) [EL, p. 828]

Deaths –

1968 – Groton, CT. Husband Edward Kimmel dies. He is buried in the United States Naval Cemetery at Annapolis, MD. (See 26 February 1882; 7 December 1941; 17 December 1941.) [KE, p. 517]

15 May –

1825 – Versailles, KY. Marquis de La Fayette passes through town. Stays the night with Major John Keene, five miles from Lexington. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1882 – Louisville, KY. Twenty-five local citizens meet with a committee appointed by the presbytery, at corner of Highland Avenue and E Broadway (now Cherokee Road). They agree that the church organized there will be called the Highland Presbyterian Church of Louisville, Kentucky. This makes it the oldest church in the Highlands east of Cave Hill Cemetery. [EL, p. 384-5]

1884 – Louisville, KY. The Filson Club is founded. [KE, p. 317-8]

1900 – The 11,520-ton battleship U.S.S. Kentuckycommissioned. [KE, p. 489]

1934 – Louisville, KY. The Louisville and Interurban Railroad Company abandons Shelbyville line. [EL, p. 418-20]

1991 – Louisville, KY. Little Sisters of the Poor open another facility. (See 26 September 1869.) [EL, p. 524]

Births –

1863 – Evansville, IN. Annie Fellows Johnston born. She will become famous as author of the “Little Colonel” books. [KE, p. 477-8]

1900 – Louisville, KY. Andrew Broaddus born. He will be mayor of Louisville 1953-57. His executive order in 1955 will end segregation in Louisville’s parks, swimming pools, and amphitheatre. His term will also see the beginning of urban renewal. [EL, p. 129]

1911 – Terre Haute, IN. Mary Alice (Hale) Hadley born. She will found Hadley Pottery. [KE, p. 397]

16 May –

1825 – Lexington, KY. The Marquis de La Fayette feted with military parade and speeches at Transylvania University and the Lexington Female Academy. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1917 – Louisville, KY, to Cincinnati, OH. The City of Louisvillemakes her last run. Tomorrow, she will be “laid up” in Covington. (See 2 April 1984; 18 April 1894; 5 April 1896; 30 January 1918.) [Schrage and Clare, p. 58]

Deaths –

1893 – Louisville, KY. Alfred Victor Du Pont dies. First report is that he suffered a fatal heart attack, but he was shot by bordello proprietor Maggie Payne, demanding financial support for a child she claimed was his. He is buried at the family estate on the Brandywine River in Delaware. (See 18 April 1833 entry.) [KE, p. 275; EL, p. 257-8]

1965 – Wendover, Leslie County, KY. Mary Carson Breckinridge, founder of the Frontier Nursing Service, dies. She is buried in Lexington Cemetery. [KE, p. 119]

17 May –

1841 – Louisville, KY. David L. Beatty begins his term as mayor. The State Institute for the Blind will be established, a waterworks authorized for construction, and the mercantile library begin operating. (See also 10 May 1844 entry.) [EL, p. 79]

1853 – New Orleans, LA. The A.L. Shotwell in its race with the EclipseShotwellwill arrive in Louisville in four days, nine hours, twenty-nine minutes. Wagers were held up; captains were required to submit voluminous documentation; and a new race was demanded. (See also 14 May 1853; 6 June 1853.) [EL, p. 262]

1870 – Louisville, KY. A group of 100 persons meets in the Walnut Street Baptist Church lecture room, and commit to be the Broadway Baptist Church. [EL, p. 130]

1875 – Louisville, KY. Aristides, owned and bred by H. Price McGrath, trained by Ansel Williamson, Oliver Lewis aboard, wins the first Kentucky Derby, 1 miles, in 2:37 , the fastest time for a three-year-old to date. [EL, p. 48]

1924 – Louisville, KY. Celebrating the golden anniversary of Churchill Downs and the Kentucky Derby, Matt Winn commissions Lemon and Son Jewelers to create trophies for the Derby and Oaks. The distinctive 14-carat gold lidded cup is presented to Black Gold. [KE, p. 467-70]

Deaths –

1875 – Lexington, KY. John Cabell Breckinridge dies. [KE, p. 118]

18 May –

1797 – Bardstown, KY. Louis-Philippe of Orleans (Louis XVIII 1830-48) arrives on his journey through the West. (See 21 May 1797 entry.) [KE, p. 358-9] His diary records they arrived at “Mr. Hodgins place” (now Larue County) in the morning. After dark, they arrived at “Captain Been’s” in “Beardstown.” [KE, p. 574]

1820 – Elkton, KY. Town is incorporated, having been laid out by Thomas Garvin and Thomas Jameson in 1819. It is now the county seat of Todd County. [KE, p. 291]

1825 – Georgetown, KY. Marquis de La Fayette arrives and stays the night. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1860 – Louisville, KY. Cornerstone laid for First Christian Church on northeast corner of 4thand Walnut Streets. The property will be sold in 1909. It is presently the site of the Starks Building. [Potter]

1886 – Frankfort, KY. Urged by the Colored Teachers State Association, the legislature votes to establish a normal school for African Americans. This will become Kentucky State University. [KE, p. 514-15]

1933 – Washington, D.C. Congress passes the Tennessee Valley Authority Act, creating the TVA. [KE, p. 875-6]

Births –

1918 – Madisonville, KY. James Fleming Gordon born. As federal judge for the Western District of Kentucky (1965-84), in 1965, he will dismiss General Edwin-Walker libel suit against the Louisville Courier-Journaland WHAS-TV for their coverage of his participation in a protest against the admission of James Meredith to the University of Mississippi. He will rule that Walker was a public figure who had thrust himself into the news. Even more controversially, in 1975, he will draft the busing plan to desegregate the Louisville and Jefferson County school systems. [KE, p.379]  

Deaths –

1808 – Kentucky. The Reverend Elijah Craig, Baptist preacher, educator, entrepreneur, and the man who developed Bourbon whiskey, dies. [KE, p. 238-9]

19 May –

1825 – Cincinnati, OH. Marquis de La Fayette arrives. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1875 – Louisville, KY. Vinaigrette wins the first Kentucky Oaks. [EL, p. 476-7]

Births –

1877 – Silver Creek Township, IN. Tom Mercer Girdler born. A businessman educated in Louisville, he will fight against labor unions, but will be credited with helping to bring assembly line mass production to the aircraft industry. (See 4 February 1965.) [EL, p. 341]

1882 – Jefferson County, KY. Henry Irvin Fox born. He will be county judge. (See 1 January 1926; 31 December 1933; 5 December 1957.) [EL, p. 318]

Deaths –

1840 – Kentucky. Former governor John Adair dies. He is buried in Frankfort Cemetery. [KE, p. 2]

20 May –

1777 – Logan’s Station (St. Asaph), KY. Indians begin a siege which lasts 13 days. [KE, p. 569-70]

1815 - Louisville, KY. Henry M. Shreve arrives, aboard steamboat Enterprise,25 days out from New Orleans, LA – first boat to steam upriver. He brought boat up over Falls and continued on to Pittsburg, PA.

1825 – Cincinnati, OH. Midnight. The Marquis de La Fayette boards steamer, for upriver trip to West Virginia. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1938 – Shively, KY. Settled in the 1780s, the city is now incorporated – a promptly annexes a section of Louisville containing eight distilleries with a property value over $20 million. [KE, p. 819]

1844 – Kentucky. Owsley County formed; county seat Owsley Court House will be incorporated two years later as Booneville. [KE, p. 102]

1896 – Orange County, NC. Robert Worth Bingham and Eleanor Miller marry. [KE, p. 80]

21 May –

1797 – Bardstown, KY. Louis-Philippe and his party depart. (See 18 May 1797 entry.) [KE, p. 358-9]

1825 – Maysville, KY. The Marquis de La Fayette visits for several hours in the afternoon. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 22 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1830 – Louisville, KY. “Jim Crow” enters the American lexicon and Thomas D. Rice becomes the “father of American minstrelsy.” At Samuel Drake’s theatre, Rice premieres a song he has created after observing Jim Crowe, the enslaved servant at a nearby livery stable. Elderly and arthritic, Crowe shuffled and hopped as he tended the horses, all the while singing. Rice donned black-face, danced and sang “Jump Jim Crow.” He took 20 curtain calls. The blackface minstrel show was born. [EL, p. 449]

1860 – Louisville, KY. A small tornado crosses into Portland from New Albany, IN. It takes the roof from the United States Marine Hospital and sinks 23 coal barges. No deaths are reported. [EL, p. 889] Woodlawn Race Course opens. [EL, p. 950-1]

1862 – Corinth, MS. Drummer William H. Horsfall, of Newport, KY, earns the Congressional Medal of Honor. [KE, p. 222-224]

1870 – Louisville, KY. Freedmen’s Pleasure Garden opens. It will feature speakers, sports and religious programs, but survives only one year, closing after the 1871 season. [EL, p. 320]

1921 – Louisville, KY. A forty-year tradition begins with a Derby Eve boxing match at the Jefferson County Armory (now The Gardens of Louisville). [EL, p. 109]

Births –

1867 – Shelbyville, KY. Augustus Owsley Stanley born. He will be governor 1915-19. (See 12 August 1958.) [KE, p. 846-7]

22 May –

1798 – Jefferson County, KY. Davis Floyd commissioned a second lieutenant of cavalry, First Regiment, Jefferson County militia. [EL, p. 299-300]

1825 – Ohio River, KY. The Marquis de La Fayette passes out of Kentucky territorial waters. (See 15 August 1824; 30 April 1825; 2 May 1825; 3-4 May 1825; 5-6 May 1825; 7-8 May 1825; 9 May 1825; 11 May 1825; 13 May 1825; 14 May 1825; 15 May 1825; 16 May 1825; 18 May 1825; 19-20 May 1825; 21 May 1825; 7 September 1825.) [KE, p. 528-9]

1863 – Vicksburg, MS. Private William Steinmetz, of Newport, KY, earns the Congressional Medal of Honor. [KE, p. 222-224]

1902 – Murray, KY (?) The Wireless Telephone Company of America is incorporated. Nathan Stubblefield is a stockholder. He hopes to develop and market his transmitter-receiver through this company, but the company will fail. (See 27 December 1860; 1 January 1902; 20 March 1902; 28 March 1928.) [KE, p. 859]

1937 – New York, NY. Louisvillian Lou Tate opens her exhibit “Folk Arts of Kentucky,” at the Folk Arts Center. [EL, p. 107]

Births –

1818 – Mercer County, KY. Jeremiah T. Boyle born. [KE, p. 109]

1849 – Louisville, KY. Bertha Mathilde Honore Palmer born. She will become one of the wealthiest women in the country. (See 5 May 1918.) [EL, p. 687-8]

1871 – Louisville, KY. Arthur A. Will born. He will be mayor 17 November 1925 – June 1927. (See 8 October 1940.) [EL, p. 942]

23 May –

1775 – Boonesborough, KY.. The House of Delegates of the colony of Transylvania meets at Boonesborough, under a tree called the Divine Elm. They draw up laws and a contract to run the colony. [KE, p. 100]

1785 – Danville, KY. The second statehood convention convenes. [KE, p. 848-9]

Births –

1928 – Maysville, KY. Rosemary Clooney born. [KE, p. 208-9]

Deaths –

1918 – Louisville, KY. John Breckinridge Castleman dies. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See 30 June 1841.) [KE, p. 169]

1914 – Washington, DC. William O’Connell Bradley, Kentucky’s first Republican governor dies. He is buried in Frankfort. [KE, p. 112]

1918 – Louisville, KY. John Breckinridge Castleman dies. He was a veteran of the Civil War and the Spanish American War. He served as adjutant general of Kentucky, and as military governor of Puerto Rico. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See also 30 June 1841 entry.) [EL, p. 163-4]

24 May –

Births –

1797 – near Shepherdsville, KY. James Turner Morehead born. He will be the first native-born governor 1834-36. (See 28 December 1854.) [KE, p. 141] [KE, p. 648]

25 May –

1793 – Baltimore, MD. Stephen Theodore Badin becomes the first Roman Catholic priest to be ordained in the United States. He leaves immediately for his missionary assignment to Kentucky. A staunch Federalist, he sought to consolidate control of church lands in his own hands, which was not acceptable to the Kentucky farmers, or to Bishop Benedict Joseph Flaget, who arrived in 1811. (See also 17 July 1768 and 19 April 1853 entries.) [KE, p. 43]

1905 – Frankfort, KY. Ground clearing and excavation for new Kentucky capitol building begun. [KE, p. 160-2]

1950 – Louisville, KY. A 42,400-square-foot terminal opens on the east side of Standiford Field. It is named in honor of the chairman of the Louisville and Jefferson County Air Board, Addison W. Lee, Jr. [EL, p. 9]

Births –

1936 – Olive Hill, KY. Tom T. Hall born. He will become a well-known country singer. [KE, p. 399]

Deaths –

1877 – Paris, KY. Richard Hawes dies. (See 6 February 1797; 7 April 1862; 8 April 1862; 4 October 1862.) [KE, p. 418-9]

1946 – New York, NY. Patty Smith Hill dies. She is buried in Louisville’s Cave Hill Cemetery. (See 27 March 1868; 27 Jun 1859; 5 June 1916.) [KE, p. 431] http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0384530/bio

1967 – Pewee Valley, KY. Flem D. Sampson dies. He is buried in Barbourville, KY. [KE, p. 795-6]

26 May –

1788 – Salt River near present-day Shepherdsville, KY. Henry Crist and Solomon Spears, and a salt-making party in a flatboat attacked by Indians. Spears killed, Crist wounded in the Battle of the Kettles. [EL, p. 232]

1864 – [location] General Simon Bolivar Buckner surrenders the army of General Edmund Kirby-Smith. [KE, p. 136]

1949 – Gethsemani, KY. Thomas Merton ordained priest. (See 31 January 1915; 10 December 1941; 10 December 1968.) [KE, p. 629]

Births –

1907 – Louisville, KY. Charles W. Anderson Jr. born. He will become an attorney and a civil rights leader, elected to the Kentucky House of Representatives, in 1935. He secured legislation improving education for all students, white and black, consideration for teachers, white and black, and is credited with the repeal of Kentucky’s public hanging law. Gov. A. B. Chandler commissioned him a Kentucky Colonel, the first African American so honored. (See also 14 June 1960 entry.) [KE, p. 20]

27 May –

1778 – Lord Dunmore’s Island, VA (now) KY. George Rogers Clark establishes about twenty settlers. They will rename the place Corn Island. Louisville has begun. [KE, p. 228]

1816 – Sandersville, KY. Lewis Sanders advertises in Kentucky Gazette: “On Thursday, the 25thday of July next there will be exhibited at Sanders Gardens, Sandersville, two and a half miles northwest of Lexington, fine cattle, sheep, hogs and horses.” Prizes were to be awarded at this first known agricultural fair in Kentucky. [EL, p. 400-1]

1968 – Louisville, KY. A crowd of about four hundred people gather at the intersection of Twenty-eighth Street and Greenwood Avenue to protest the possible reinstatement of police officer Michael Clifford, who admitted to abusing Manfred Reid during an altercation earlier that month. The violence will escalate, ebbing and flowing for several days. Two African Americans are killed. Still, Louisville is much less violent than Detroit, Los Angeles, etc. [EL, p. 189-90]

1969 – Binh Duong, Vietnam. Sergeant Charles Clinton Fleek, of Petersburg, KY, earns the Congressional Medal of Honor. [KE, p. 222-224]

Births –

1811 – near Georgetown, KY. George Johnson born. He will be the first governor of the Confederate government of Kentucky. (See 8 April 1862.) [KE, p. 473]

28 May –

1774 – Falls of the Ohio. The Fincastle surveyors arrive. They will conduct surveys in Kentucky, in order for Virginia to award land grants to veterans of the French and Indian War. [KE, p. 318-9]

1775 – Boonesborogh, KY. First recorded public Christian worship service in Kentucky, conducted by Anglican clergyman, the Reverend John Lyth. [KE, p. 295-6]

1872 – Louisville, KY. St. Louis Cemetery incorporated. Burials are at least as early as 1867. [EL, p. 169-71]

1880 – Louisa, KY. More than 200 Regulators surrender to Judge James E. Stewart. Facing down frequent death threats, Judge Steward had asked Governor Luke P. Blackburn (1879-83) for troops, and promised clemency to all Regulators who voluntarily surrender to him. The Regulator Uprising which had spread from Elliott County to Morgan, Rowan, Carter, Boyd and Lawrence counties at last falters and fails. Sporadic resurgences will continue into the 20thcentury, but the invisible network no longer controls the area. (See 20 October 1879.) [KE, p. 762]

1977 – Southgate, KY. More than 2,000 people are crammed into the Beverly Hill nightclub, when faulty wiring starts a fire around 9:00 p.m. There is no sprinkler system. More than 500 professionals and volunteers fight the fire, but 165 people die. [KE, p. 74]

1991 – Washington, DC. In Illinois v. Kentucky, the United States Supreme Court sets the common boundary at the low-water mark of the Ohio River, but does not define what the low-water line is. [KE, p. 103]

Births –

1838 – Scott County, KY. Basil W. Duke born. [KE, p. 273]

29 May –

1774 – Lord Dunmore’s Island, Fincastle County, VA. (Corn Island, Louisville, KY.) Surveying party arrives. (See 22 April 1774.) [EL, p. 499]

1869 – Kentucky. Menifee County formed from parts of Bath, Montgomery, Morgan, Powell and Wolfe counties. It is named in honor of Congressman Richard H. Menefee, although not spelled the same. [KE, p. 625]

Births –

1736 – Hanover County, VA. Patrick Henry born. (See 6 June 1799.) [KE, p. 425]

Deaths –

1882 – Louisville, KY. Joshua Fry Speed dies. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See 14 November 1814.) [KE, p. 841]

1940 – Worcestershire, England. Mary Anderson dies. [EL 35]

1949 – near Hyden, KY. Willie Sandlin dies. He is buried in Hurricane Cemetery, near Hyden. In September 1990 he will be reburied in Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville. (See 26 September 1918.) [KE, p. 797]

30 May –

1806 – Logan County, KY. Bank of Red River. Jackson-Dickinson Duel. Charles Dickinson fires immediately, but Andrew Jackson does not fall. He levels his pistol and fires, but the gun stops at half-cock. Jackson tried again – and mortally wounds his adversary. On the way back to their lodgings, Jackson’s supporters find that he, too, is wounded. [KE, p. 460]

1882 – Catlettsburg, KY. George Ellis is tried for murder in the Ashland Tragedy case. Convicted, he was sentenced to life in prison. (See also 23 December 1881; 16 January 1882; 31 May 1882; 1 November 1882; 12 October 1883; and 27 March 1885 entries.) [KE, p. 38]

1895 – Louisville, KY. Fulton Gordon shoots and kills his wife, Nellie Bush Gordon, and Archibald Dixon Brown, son and personal secretary of Governor John Young Brown Jr. The victims were in bed together at Lucy Smith’s house of assignation, 1025 W Madison Street. (See also 9 May 1895 and 1 July 1895.) [EL, p. 136]

1907 – Morgantown, KY. A Civil War monument in front of the Butler County courthouse is dedicated. It lists the names of Butler Countians on either side of the war. Funded through the efforts of Union and Confederate veterans, it is one of few monuments in the commonwealth to honor the soldiers of both sides of the conflict. [KE, p. 147]

1927 – Letcher County, KY. Flood. [KE, p. 546-7]

1958 – Louisville, KY. Kentucky Railway Museum (KRM) opens to the public. (See 30 September 1957.) [EL, p. 478]

Births –

1964 – Ashland, KY. Christina Ciminella born to Michael and Diana Judd Ciminella. In 1983, mother and daughter will audition with RCA records. They will become famous as Naomi and Wynonna, “The Judds.” (See 11 January 1946.) [KE, p. 481]

Deaths –

1899 – Mayfield, KY. Henry Wooldridge dies. He is entombed above-ground in Maplewood Cemetery. Only he is buried on the plot, but there are 16 life-sized statues of himself, family members, dogs and a horse. It is sometimes dubbed “The Parade Going Nowhere.” [KE, p. 967]

1932 – Charles Harvey Joiner dies. He is buried in Walnut Ridge Cemetery, Jeffersonville, IN. (See 8 April 1852.) [KE, p. 478-9]

1960 – Louisville, KY. Dann Conrad Byck Sr. dies. Businessman, civic leader and philanthropist, he had been acting mayor of Louisville for one month, in 1947. (See 24 October 1899 entry.) [KE, p. 147-8]

31 May –

1815 – Louisville, KY. Henry Shreve arrives in Shippingport with the Enterprise, 25 days after leaving New Orleans, LA. This proves steam can power a boat against the current of the Mississippi and the Ohio Rivers. Shreve further punched his point home by bringing the Enterpriseup over the Falls and continuing on to Pittsburgh, PA.

1822 – Louisville, KY. First meeting of congregation which will become Christ Church Cathedral. [EL, p. 178-9] Fifteen communicants become charter members. [EL, p. 275-6]

1882 – Catlettsburg, KY. A mob breaks George Ellis out of jail and lynches him in Ashland. This is retribution for the Ashland Tragedy. . (See also 23 December 1881; 16 January 1882; 30 May 1882; 1 November 1882; 12 October 1883; and 27 March 1885 entries.) [KE, p. 38]

1924 – Louisville, KY. The newly created Oaks trophy is presented to Princess Doreen, winner of the 50thrunning of the race. [EL, p. 476-7]

1930 – Lexington, KY. University of Kentucky board of trustees appoints Adolph Rupp instructor in physical education, in charge of varsity basketball. He will stay for 40 years. (See 2 September 1901; 10 December 1977.) [KE, p. 787]

Deaths –

1877 – Louisville, KY. John Joyes dies, a white male born and died in Louisville. He is buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. (See 8 January 1799; 9 December 1787; 4 May 1866.) [EL, p. 454]

1884 – New York, NY. Benjamin Bosworth Smith dies. He is buried in Frankfort (KY) Cemetery. (See 13 June 1784; 31 October 1832.) [KE, p. 829]

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